October 06, 2014

2/13/2014 @ 12:00AM

Unwilling Lenders

 

If Refco’s creditors get their way, hedge fund investors will face yet another risk.

Imagine the unimaginable–Fidelity Investments goes bankrupt. Fidelity’s creditors try to get what they’re owed–from the $1.2 trillion in client assets managed by the company. Sound crazy? It is, but it’s close to what Refco’s creditors are trying to do to investors in a hedge fund that kept accounts with the failed commodities trading firm.

Starting in 2004 brokers from firms like A.G. Edwards and Merrill Lynch sold clients shares of the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund, run by a company called PlusFunds. Refco was the clearing broker. Unlike most hedge funds, this one kept its barriers low. A net worth of $45,000 and the same in annual income was enough to qualify a customer.

The fund, which tracks the S&P Managed Futures Index and is meant to provide a hedge against the stock market, managed at least $312 million from some 1,000 investors when Refco collapsed. The fund were deposited with Refco, which placed the money in offshore accounts, where they aren’t subject to limits on margin debt that apply to domestic accounts

A lawsuit filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York by Refco’s unsecured creditors contends that when the fraud that led to Refco’s bankruptcy became clear in October, PlusFunds Chairman Christopher Sugrue stormed Refco’s offices and had $312 million transferred to new accounts at Lehman Brothers.

The creditors, including Wells Fargo and Cargill, say that this money should have stayed within Refco and that Sugrue and PlusFunds should get in line. The suit implies that Sugrue, a former Refco employee, used his influence at Refco to slide in front of other creditors. Luc A. Despins, the Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy attorney who filed the suit, declined comment.

But it’s not PlusFunds’ money–the $312 million comes from the investors in the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund. The creditors’ claims on those assets have prevented investors from getting their money back.

Marc Lowlicht, a certified financial planner with Further Lane Asset Management in Manhattan, has half a dozen clients in the fund. He complains: “If I wanted them to be creditors, I would have sold them bonds.”


October 06, 2014

2/13/2014 @ 12:00AM

Unwilling Lenders

 

If Refco’s creditors get their way, hedge fund investors will face yet another risk.

Imagine the unimaginable–Fidelity Investments goes bankrupt. Fidelity’s creditors try to get what they’re owed–from the $1.2 trillion in client assets managed by the company. Sound crazy? It is, but it’s close to what Refco’s creditors are trying to do to investors in a hedge fund that kept accounts with the failed commodities trading firm.

Starting in 2004 brokers from firms like A.G. Edwards and Merrill Lynch sold clients shares of the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund, run by a company called PlusFunds. Refco was the clearing broker. Unlike most hedge funds, this one kept its barriers low. A net worth of $45,000 and the same in annual income was enough to qualify a customer.

The fund, which tracks the S&P Managed Futures Index and is meant to provide a hedge against the stock market, managed at least $312 million from some 1,000 investors when Refco collapsed. The fund were deposited with Refco, which placed the money in offshore accounts, where they aren’t subject to limits on margin debt that apply to domestic accounts

A lawsuit filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York by Refco’s unsecured creditors contends that when the fraud that led to Refco’s bankruptcy became clear in October, PlusFunds Chairman Christopher Sugrue stormed Refco’s offices and had $312 million transferred to new accounts at Lehman Brothers.

The creditors, including Wells Fargo and Cargill, say that this money should have stayed within Refco and that Sugrue and PlusFunds should get in line. The suit implies that Sugrue, a former Refco employee, used his influence at Refco to slide in front of other creditors. Luc A. Despins, the Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy attorney who filed the suit, declined comment.

But it’s not PlusFunds’ money–the $312 million comes from the investors in the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund. The creditors’ claims on those assets have prevented investors from getting their money back.

Marc Lowlicht, a certified financial planner with Further Lane Asset Management in Manhattan, has half a dozen clients in the fund. He complains: “If I wanted them to be creditors, I would have sold them bonds.”



September 14, 2014

Q: What do dinosaurs and decent lawyers have in common?
A: They're both extinct.

September 11, 2014

 
 

People Record For Christopher Sugrue Show All Details â?¼

Current Phone Number
(516) 431-0519
Current Address
117 West
East Rockaway, NY 11518
Current Email
CS44@WEBTV.NET

4 Possible Relatives View Details â?¼

5 Known Addresses View Details â?¼

3 Email Addresses View Details â?¼

2 AKAs View Details â?¼

 


Additional Results for Christopher J Sugrue

 Stars

sponsored by InstantCheckmate.com

Christopher   Sugrue

  • Cuffs
  • arrests
  • Phone
  • phone
  • Location
  • addresses
  • Email
  • email
  • People
  • relatives
CURRENT CONTACT INFORMATION for Christopher Sugrue in East Rockaway, NY
Name
Age
Location
Current Contact Information
SPONSORED by PeopleSmart.com
MORE RESULTS for Christopher Sugrue SPONSORED by Peoplefinders.com
Name
Age
Location
 
 
Christopher S Stevens
38
Holyoke, MA
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
New York, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher J Sugrue
52
Chester, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
Newburgh, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
Newburgh, NY
Address
Phone
 
MORE RESULTS for Christopher Sugrue
Name
Age
Location
 
 
Christopher S Stevens
38
Holyoke, MA
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
New York, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher J Sugrue
52
Chester, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
Newburgh, NY
Address
Phone
 
Christopher Sugrue
 
Newburgh, NY
Address
Phone
 
What's in Your Background Report?
See what records are publicly available in your background report.
Search for People by Last Name   
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 

August 10, 2014

 

Recent Editorials

 
 
 

receive the latest by email:
subscribe to the new york sun's free mailing list

Comment on this article

Name
Email Address
Title of Comments
Comments:
 

Note: Comments are reviewed and, in some cases, edited before posting. Not all comments are posted. Chances of a comment being posted are increased if the comment is polite, accurate, grammatical, and substantive or newsworthy. The Sun does not accept comments referring to individuals by only their first names or by nicknames and in the case of most public officials requires, on first reference, a title, such as President Obama or Secretary Clinton. Second references to individuals and public officials require in most cases an honorific, such as Mr. Obama or Mrs. Clinton. Comments adhering to these style points stand a better chance of being posted.

Would You Like to Become a Sustaining Subscriber of the Sun? Sign up now

* Inquire about the Sun Seminars

Sustaining Subscriber Login

Follow The New York Sun

Facebook    Twitter    RSS    Join Mailing List
Click to learn more... Click to learn more...
Click to learn more...


August 10, 2014

Menu
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 
 
 

Tracking the Numbers

SEC Plumbs Money Firm's Files

Probe of Refco Leads to Company Started by Ex-Senior Executive; A Knowledge of Inner Workings

 
Updated March 24, 2006 12:01 a.m. ET

Authorities and some creditors of Refco Inc. want to know more about money the brokerage firm shuttled between some of its business units in the days before it filed for bankrupty protection.

They may be able to learn some important details from Christopher Sugrue, a New York money manager and past employee of Refco, which imploded just weeks after its August initial public offering when Refco disclosed that its former chief executive, Phillip Bennett, had hidden bad debts.

U.S. securities regulators have been seeking information regarding such business dealings with Refco. And lawyers working for Refco unsecured creditors have sought information from Mr. Sugrue because of what court filings by those creditors describe as a "close relationship" between the 35-year-old Long Island native and Refco, where Mr. Sugrue was an executive before he helped launch PlusFunds Group Inc.

After Refco filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy-court protection Oct. 17, the Securities and Exchange Commission visited PlusFunds' Manhattan offices and asked for a battery of records, according to a report attached to a sworn statement by S. David Peress, a crisis consultant hired by PlusFunds.

In an interview, Mr. Peress said the firm is cooperating with "a compliance examination." Lawyers for Refco unsecured creditors also have asked for documents related to PlusFunds and Mr. Sugrue, according to court filings. A spokesman for the SEC declined to comment, but the court document that references the SEC request says: "The SEC has not made any suggestion that any action is contemplated involving [PlusFunds]."

Mr. Sugrue's own firm filed for bankruptcy-court protection earlier this month, after a wave of PlusFunds clients demanded their money when some of their cash transferred from Refco accounts was frozen. A portion of the money and trades Mr. Sugrue helped oversee for PlusFunds clients often processed through Refco's sprawling brokerage firm. Mr. Sugrue initially was able to prevent that money from being frozen by persuading Refco to transfer the funds from unregulated offshore accounts to regulated, onshore accounts.

Now PlusFunds is up for sale. Speaking by phone from Florida, where he was vacationing with his family at Disney World, Mr. Sugrue stressed that he did nothing wrong in the Refco matter. "I'll say that unequivocally," he said. Mr. Sugrue said his business "got caught up in a drive-by shooting."

Court filings by Refco creditors seeking to recover the money Mr. Sugrue had transferred to the onshore accounts cite ties between the money manager and Refco, including loans the brokerage firm provided last year to entities affiliated with Mr. Sugrue. Those loans were secured by equity in PlusFunds.

Before starting PlusFunds in 1998, Mr. Sugrue was a senior executive at Refco for more than five years, according to a biography in court papers. In addition to working with hedge funds on the firm's behalf, Mr. Sugrue helped negotiate the sale of 10% in Refco to Austrian bank Bawag P.S.K. in 1999. During that time, Refco was chaired by Thomas Dittmer, who later was listed on a register of PlusFunds shareholders. Mr. Dittmer couldn't be reached for comment. Mr. Sugrue's knowledge of the inner workings of Refco were demonstrated in a tense exchange last October. Six days before Refco began bankruptcy proceedings, Mr. Sugrue burst into Refco's Manhattan office demanding that the brokerage firm move more than $300 million of PlusFunds' client money "to seg funds," according to a sworn statement by Refco Treasurer Matthew Hreben.

Specifically, Mr. Sugrue wanted his clients' money moved from Refco's unregulated Bermuda account, where it was mingled with Refco's money, to segregated, or "seg," accounts, where it presumably would be less vulnerable to Refco creditors. The money was moved the next day and soon sent to accounts at Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., according to court papers and sworn statements by Refco employees.

Stanley S. Arkin, a lawyer for Mr. Sugrue, said his client should be given a "silver star" for looking out for his clients. Mr. Sugrue said his investors told him: "Thank God you went and got it. That's what you are supposed to do."

Yet Refco creditors got a federal court to freeze the money in the Lehman accounts, alleging in court papers that Mr. Sugrue was given preferential treatment. Those frozen accounts triggered the redemptions by PlusFunds' clients -- and the subsequent bankruptcy-court filing. The clients yanked more than $1 billion from the firms' funds -- about half their assets -- in the first two months of this year.

It is a quick reversal of fortune for Mr. Sugrue. Still on the board at PlusFunds, he is no longer an employee. "It feels like you got thrown out of the house you built," Mr. Sugrue said in the phone interview.

PlusFunds mainly offered funds designed to mimic the performance of Standard & Poor's hedge-fund indexes. The controversial money transferred from Refco was invested there to track 15 funds in S&P's Managed Futures index. PlusFunds' assets stood at more than $2.5 billion last summer.

After Mr. Sugrue started his fund firm, he continued to work closely with his old employer. Refco served as a clearing broker for several portfolios overseen by PlusFunds, according to court papers filed by Refco's creditors. And in 2003, Refco hired PlusFunds to manage a futures fund that did much of its trading through accounts at Refco, according to court filings by Refco creditors.

But the relationship extended beyond trading. Last spring, Refco Capital lent $158 million to Suffolk LLC, an entity affiliated with Mr. Sugrue, according to court papers filed by Refco creditors. Mr. Sugrue used the money to buy out minority shareholders of PlusFunds, the creditors say in court papers, adding that since then, Refco units lent another $50 million to entities related to Mr. Sugrue and other PlusFunds shareholders. Of that, $19.4 million went to an entity in which Mr. Sugrue is the sole member, court documents claim.

Several potential acquirers have emerged for PlusFunds, which will be auctioned off in April, according to public disclosures.

Separately, the federal bankruptcy judge overseeing Refco's bankruptcy proceedings ruled yesterday that Refco creditors investigating the brokerage firm's meltdown are entitled to documents from the underwriters of Refco's IPO. The judge also said former Refco directors, including private-equity investor Thomas H. Lee, should be allowed to collect on an insurance policy to cover legal expenses they incur in shareholder suits related to Refco's collapse.

A judge in a criminal case against Mr. Bennett, the former Refco CEO, set two trial dates yesterday -- Oct. 16, with a backup date of March 12, 2007. Mr. Bennett is fighting securities and fraud charges related to the Refco matter. The backup trial date was provided to accommodate Mr. Bennett's lawyer, Gary Naftalis.

—-- Peter A. McKay and Paul Davies contributed to this article.

Write to Carrick Mollenkamp at carrick.mollenkamp@wsj.com and Ian McDonald at ian.mcdonald@wsj.com

 
 
 
 
 

August 10, 2014

Browse > Home / Christopher Sugrue Firm has Thrived

Christopher Sugrue Firm has Thrived

August 04, 2014


Posted by Admin - June 22nd, 2011

PlusFunds Group Inc. is not just another hedge fund sponsor in the industry. It is owned and operated by the employees and is a high quality firm with high aspirations. The firm’s main mission is to improve prevailing standards of independent oversight and transparency in the financial services industry in the United States. A lofty, but great, goal.

Public and corporate businesses, investing individuals, and pooled investment vehicles are all present in PlusFunds Group Inc.’s list of clients. The fixed income and public equity markets are the ones that attract the most interest from PlusFunds Group Inc., which uses long and short equity, merger arbitrage, and fixed income investing methods to invest in those markets, with a special focus put on distressed debt and futures. The firm also provides clients with investment advice and options, depending upon the clients’ risk profile and needs.

PlusFunds Group Inc. is a collaboration of an assortment of businesses in the financial services industry who wishes to improve the access to information in the industry because they believed that this was a cornerstone of success in the industry.

PlusFunds Group Inc. was founded in 1998 in New York City, New York. The firm has thrived under the leadership of Chairman Christopher Sugrue. PlusFunds Group Inc. is now an industry leader.

Additional Resources:

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on Biowebinc.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on Onlinereviewinc.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Information on Hightechlistings.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on Nationalprofilebase.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on 411inconline.com

    
 

 
Share this :
 
Browse > Home / Christopher Sugrue Firm has Thrived

Christopher Sugrue Firm has Thrived

August 04, 2014


Posted by Admin - June 22nd, 2011

PlusFunds Group Inc. is not just another hedge fund sponsor in the industry. It is owned and operated by the employees and is a high quality firm with high aspirations. The firm’s main mission is to improve prevailing standards of independent oversight and transparency in the financial services industry in the United States. A lofty, but great, goal.

Public and corporate businesses, investing individuals, and pooled investment vehicles are all present in PlusFunds Group Inc.’s list of clients. The fixed income and public equity markets are the ones that attract the most interest from PlusFunds Group Inc., which uses long and short equity, merger arbitrage, and fixed income investing methods to invest in those markets, with a special focus put on distressed debt and futures. The firm also provides clients with investment advice and options, depending upon the clients’ risk profile and needs.

PlusFunds Group Inc. is a collaboration of an assortment of businesses in the financial services industry who wishes to improve the access to information in the industry because they believed that this was a cornerstone of success in the industry.

PlusFunds Group Inc. was founded in 1998 in New York City, New York. The firm has thrived under the leadership of Chairman Christopher Sugrue. PlusFunds Group Inc. is now an industry leader.

Additional Resources:

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on Biowebinc.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on Onlinereviewinc.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Information on Hightechlistings.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on Nationalprofilebase.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on 411inconline.com

    
 

 
Share this :
 
ShareThis Copy and Paste
- See more at: http://christophersugruerefco.qwizzy.com/article/christopher-sugrue-firm-has-thrived#sthash.U3PTG79J.dpuf
- See more at: http://christophersugruerefco.qwizzy.com/article/christopher-sugrue-firm-has-thrived#sthash.U3PTG79J.dpuf

Get a People Search Report on Christopher Sugrue

12 matches were found for Christopher Sugrue

back disabled Page
of 1
back disabled
  •  
Clear filters
 
back disabled Page
of 1
back disabled
            Additional information for purpose of ID only
(not included in the report)
 
  Name/Aliases Age Phone/Address Has lived in: Related with: Studied at: Worked at: Premium Report
1 Christopher D Sugrue
Christopher Sugrue
Chris Sugrue
42 Hingham, MA
Weymouth, MA
New York, NY
Naples, FL
Sewanee, TN
More Locations
Lisa Sugrue
Deborah Barry
John Sugrue
Rosemary Sugrue
Brian Sugrue
More People
Parsons School Of Design Chelsea Art Museum
Eyebeam
Shakerag Workshops
More Jobs
Get Your Report
2 Christopher K Sugrue
Christopher Sugrue
Chris Sugrue
52 Chester, NY
Weymouth, MA
Hingham, MA
Westwood, NJ
Park Ridge, NJ
More Locations
Debra Sugrue
Lisa Sugrue
John Sugrue
Susan Sugrue
Amy Downes
More People
  Fireking Baking Co Inc
Eat Well Inc
Tosca Limited
More Jobs
Get Your Report
3 Christopher John Sugrue
Chris Sugrue
48 Belchertown, MA
New York, NY
San Francisco, CA
Wilbraham, MA
South Hadley, MA
More Locations
Mary Sugrue
Christoper Sugrue
Carol Sugrue
Fitchburg State College Mckesson Corporation Get Your Report
4 Christopher S Sugrue
Christopher Stevens
38 Holyoke, MA
Florence, MA
Saratoga Springs, NY
Cherry Hill, NJ
More Locations
Erin Fitzgerald   Td Bank Get Your Report
5 Christopher C Sugrue 43 Highland Park, IL
Jersey City, NJ
Cleveland, OH
East Rockaway, NY
Milford, NJ
More Locations
Simin Haery
Lily Sugrue
Michael Sugrue
George Sugrue
Kathleen Kavanagh
More People
    Get Your Report
6 Christopher P Sugrue 48 Trevor, WI
Wheaton, IL
Antioch, IL
Round Lake, IL
More Locations
Susan Abernathy
Scott Reed
Evan Reed
    Get Your Report
7 Christopher J Sugrue
Chris Sugrue
40 East Rockaway, NY
Long Beach, NY
Far Rockaway, NY
James Sugrue
Margaret Sugrue
Dennis Sugrue
    Get Your Report
8 Christopher Sugrue 61 Encinitas, CA
Wappingers Falls, NY
Ciprianod Sugrue
Michael Cipriano
Steven Cipriano
    Get Your Report
9 Christopher A Sugrue 28 Syracuse, NY Diana Stockdale
Nicholas Sugrue
    Get Your Report
10 Christopher Sugrue   New York, NY       Get Your Report
11 Christopher Sugrue   Chicago, IL       Get Your Report
12 Christopher Sugrue   Newburgh, NY       Get Your Report

Refine or Modify Your Search

 

Christopher Sugrue in the United States

We've found results for your search on Christopher Sugrue in the United States. Get detailed information like phone number, address, criminal records or background checks on Christopher Sugrue in the United States.

US Search has access to billions of public records data so you can find people like Christopher Sugrue in the United States or anyone you're searching for.


August 10, 2014

Christopher Sugrue Has Lead It To Become A Leader

April 14th, 2011 - Posted by Admin

The financial industry is ripe with corruption, bad habits, and secrecy—which has, as of late, been on display due to the recession. Bernie Madoff is an excellent example of why the financial industry in general needs more transparency, responsibility, and accountability. PlusFunds Group Inc. is one organization that is trying to improve upon the standards of transparency and independent oversight in the industry and being met with some success. It is an employee-owned and operated hedge fund sponsor.

PlusFunds Group Inc. caters to a variation of clients, including public and corporate institutions, pooled investment vehicles, and individual investors. The fixed income markets and public equity markets attract the most investment attention from PlusFunds Group Inc. Merger arbitrage, fixed income, and long or short equity are the main methods by which PlusFunds Group Inc. makes its investments. The firm focuses on distressed debt and futures.

Christopher Sugrue is the chairman of PlusFunds Group Inc., and the man who has lead it to become a leader in the industry. The company was founded in 1998 and is headquartered in the city so nice they named it twice, New York City, New York. PlusFunds Group Inc. is actually an alliance of financial firms that provides investment advice and options to clients, based upon their risk profile.

Additional Resources:

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on INC Database.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on INC Listings.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on INC 1000.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Information on Professional Database INC.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on The Corporate Database.com

 

August 10, 2014

Christopher Sugrue Has Lead It To Become A Leader

April 14th, 2011 - Posted by Admin

The financial industry is ripe with corruption, bad habits, and secrecy—which has, as of late, been on display due to the recession. Bernie Madoff is an excellent example of why the financial industry in general needs more transparency, responsibility, and accountability. PlusFunds Group Inc. is one organization that is trying to improve upon the standards of transparency and independent oversight in the industry and being met with some success. It is an employee-owned and operated hedge fund sponsor.

PlusFunds Group Inc. caters to a variation of clients, including public and corporate institutions, pooled investment vehicles, and individual investors. The fixed income markets and public equity markets attract the most investment attention from PlusFunds Group Inc. Merger arbitrage, fixed income, and long or short equity are the main methods by which PlusFunds Group Inc. makes its investments. The firm focuses on distressed debt and futures.

Christopher Sugrue is the chairman of PlusFunds Group Inc., and the man who has lead it to become a leader in the industry. The company was founded in 1998 and is headquartered in the city so nice they named it twice, New York City, New York. PlusFunds Group Inc. is actually an alliance of financial firms that provides investment advice and options to clients, based upon their risk profile.

Additional Resources:

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on INC Database.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on INC Listings.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Article on INC 1000.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Information on Professional Database INC.com

Christopher Sugrue :: Listed on The Corporate Database.com

 

August 08, 2014

Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.
 


August 08, 2014

 
Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 

Winston Churchill Quotes

 

Share with your Friends

Everyone likes a good quote - don't forget to share.

Biography

Nationality: English
Type: Statesman
Born: November 30, 1874
Died: January 24, 1965

Links

 

Get Social with BrainyQuote

Follow BrainyQuote on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ to share inspiring quotes with friends. Join now!

 
   
Get social!
 
 
  • Navigation
  Mobile Site | Privacy | Terms |  
Copyright © 2001 - 2014 BrainyQuote®
 
 

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/w/winston_churchill.html#tLoIQibmcOGyAWSh.99

August 08, 2014

Intelligent
People Search Engine

Trusted site 100% Ethical site

Find a person

Download APPs

11 people in US

age 52 view details

Known also as: Christopher K Sugrue, Chris Sugrue ...

Has lived in: Chester, NYRivervale, NJPark Ridge, NJOld Tappan, NJ ...

Related to: ...

age 48 view details

Known also as: Christoper Sugrue, Christoph J Sugrue ...

Has lived in: Belchertown, MAWilbraham, MASouth Hadley, MAPalmer, MA

Related to:

age ~48 view details

Known also as: Christopher Sugrue, Chrstophr Sugrue ...

Has lived in: Antioch, ILTrevor, WIRound Lake Beach, IL

Related to: ...

age ~28 view details

Has lived in: Syracuse, NYWarners, NYClay, NYLiverpool, NY ...

Related to: ...

age 40 view details

Known also as: Christopher Sugrue, Christopher Sugrve ...

Has lived in: East Rockaway, NYLong Beach, NYFar Rockaway, NY

age 38 view details

Has lived in: Miami Beach, FLSaratoga Spgs, NYSaratoga Springs, NY

age ~43 view details

Known also as: Christopher Sugrue, Christophe Sugrue ...

Has lived in: Jersey City, NJLong Beach, NYEast Rockaway, NY ...

Related to: ...

age 52 view details

Known also as: Christopher Sugrue, Kit Sugrue, K Sugrue

Has lived in: Siletz, ORSeal Rock, OR

Related to:

view details

Has lived in: Holyoke, MA

view details

Has lived in: Newburgh, NY

view details

Known also as: Christopher D Sugrue, Christopher Surgue, C Sugrue, Christoph D Sugrue ...

Has lived in: Weymouth, MABraintree, MAHingham, MAAllston, MA ...

Related to: ...

 

Filter your results

 
Christopher Sugrue search results US Map
 

Mentions about Christopher Sugrue

Resumes

Independent Consultant - Marketing & Advertising

Independent Consultant - Marketing & Advertising

Locality: Greater Los Angeles Area

Current: Independent Consultant - Marketing & Advertising at Christopher Sugrue

Work: Christopher Sugrue, Independent Consultant - Marketing & Advertising (2000-2013)

Show details..

Independent Marketing and Advertising Professional

Locality: Greater Los Angeles Area

Show details..

Phones & Addresses

Name Address Phone
Christopher P Sugrue 324 Arbor Ave, Wheaton, IL 60187 (630) 462-8107
Christopher P Sugrue 12033 256Th Ave, Trevor, WI 53179 (262) 862-6215
Christopher J Sugrue 171 Riverboat Village Rd, South Hadley, MA 01075 (413) 596-2670
Christopher J Sugrue 160 Manchonis Rd, Wilbraham, MA 01095 (413) 323-9560
Christopher D Sugrue 10 West St, Hingham, MA 02043 (781) 749-0395, (617) 749-0395
Christopher D Sugrue 1704 Hockley Dr, Hingham, MA 02043 (781) 749-0395
Christopher C Sugrue 85 Vermont St, Long Beach, NY 11561 (516) 431-0519
Christopher J Sugrue, Christopher Sugrue 44 Pine Hill Rd, Chester, NY 10918 (845) 469-0996, (845) 469-3996
Christopher J Sugrue 19 Centennial Way, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677 (201) 930-1372
Christopher J Sugrue 566 Dorchester Dr, Westwood, NJ 07675 (201) 930-1372

More Phones & Addresses...

Business Records

Name / Title Company / Classification Phones & Addresses
Christopher Sugrue
Chairman Co-founder
Plusfunds Group, Inc.
Business Services
1500 Broadway FL 11
New York, NY 10036
(212) 653-1900
 

Login to view premium data

 
 

August 07, 2014


August 07, 2014

Chris Sugrue has been a fundamental part of Tosca’s team for twelve years. From the day to day duties of staff management to the commitment he has to his guests, Chris works as an inspiration to his team. With his past experiences, he has had the unique opportunity to have held both front-house and back-house management positions, and understands with personal experience, the demands and duties required through the entire restaurant. This intimate knowledge helps him to maintain the superior customer service that Tosca is known for.

Prior to working at Tosca, Chris served as the Food & Beverage Manager for the Harborside Hyatt Hotel in Boston. From room service to banquets and individual restaurants and bars, including Midships Lounge and Harborside Grill, he was responsible for overseeing a staff of 100 and for all the food and beverage activities that took place.

The food and beverage industry had been a part of Chris’s life since he was a young boy. When he was 11 years old, his family moved to Hingham, MA, and he began working as a “host boy” at the South Shore Country Club and, over his 10 year employment, he worked his way up from dishwasher, to prep cook, to Executive Chef. Chris’s transition from back- to front-house occurred upon graduating from Johnson & Wales with a Business degree, when he began working for the Hyatt.

Chris really particularly enjoys the front-house experience at Tosca, because of the customer interaction that is involved. “In the twelve years I have been working here, I’ve had the pleasure to know a lot of our guests on a personal basis. We have so many regulars at Tosca; they’re more like friends and family. It’s a very rewarding job.”


August 07, 2014

Menu
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 
 
 

Tracking the Numbers

SEC Plumbs Money Firm's Files

Probe of Refco Leads to Company Started by Ex-Senior Executive; A Knowledge of Inner Workings

 
Updated March 24, 2006 12:01 a.m. ET

Authorities and some creditors of Refco Inc. want to know more about money the brokerage firm shuttled between some of its business units in the days before it filed for bankrupty protection.

They may be able to learn some important details from Christopher Sugrue, a New York money manager and past employee of Refco, which imploded just weeks after its August initial public offering when Refco disclosed that its former chief executive, Phillip Bennett, had hidden bad debts.

U.S. securities regulators have been seeking information regarding such business dealings with Refco. And lawyers working for Refco unsecured creditors have sought information from Mr. Sugrue because of what court filings by those creditors describe as a "close relationship" between the 35-year-old Long Island native and Refco, where Mr. Sugrue was an executive before he helped launch PlusFunds Group Inc.

After Refco filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy-court protection Oct. 17, the Securities and Exchange Commission visited PlusFunds' Manhattan offices and asked for a battery of records, according to a report attached to a sworn statement by S. David Peress, a crisis consultant hired by PlusFunds.

In an interview, Mr. Peress said the firm is cooperating with "a compliance examination." Lawyers for Refco unsecured creditors also have asked for documents related to PlusFunds and Mr. Sugrue, according to court filings. A spokesman for the SEC declined to comment, but the court document that references the SEC request says: "The SEC has not made any suggestion that any action is contemplated involving [PlusFunds]."

Mr. Sugrue's own firm filed for bankruptcy-court protection earlier this month, after a wave of PlusFunds clients demanded their money when some of their cash transferred from Refco accounts was frozen. A portion of the money and trades Mr. Sugrue helped oversee for PlusFunds clients often processed through Refco's sprawling brokerage firm. Mr. Sugrue initially was able to prevent that money from being frozen by persuading Refco to transfer the funds from unregulated offshore accounts to regulated, onshore accounts.

Now PlusFunds is up for sale. Speaking by phone from Florida, where he was vacationing with his family at Disney World, Mr. Sugrue stressed that he did nothing wrong in the Refco matter. "I'll say that unequivocally," he said. Mr. Sugrue said his business "got caught up in a drive-by shooting."

Court filings by Refco creditors seeking to recover the money Mr. Sugrue had transferred to the onshore accounts cite ties between the money manager and Refco, including loans the brokerage firm provided last year to entities affiliated with Mr. Sugrue. Those loans were secured by equity in PlusFunds.

Before starting PlusFunds in 1998, Mr. Sugrue was a senior executive at Refco for more than five years, according to a biography in court papers. In addition to working with hedge funds on the firm's behalf, Mr. Sugrue helped negotiate the sale of 10% in Refco to Austrian bank Bawag P.S.K. in 1999. During that time, Refco was chaired by Thomas Dittmer, who later was listed on a register of PlusFunds shareholders. Mr. Dittmer couldn't be reached for comment. Mr. Sugrue's knowledge of the inner workings of Refco were demonstrated in a tense exchange last October. Six days before Refco began bankruptcy proceedings, Mr. Sugrue burst into Refco's Manhattan office demanding that the brokerage firm move more than $300 million of PlusFunds' client money "to seg funds," according to a sworn statement by Refco Treasurer Matthew Hreben.

Specifically, Mr. Sugrue wanted his clients' money moved from Refco's unregulated Bermuda account, where it was mingled with Refco's money, to segregated, or "seg," accounts, where it presumably would be less vulnerable to Refco creditors. The money was moved the next day and soon sent to accounts at Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., according to court papers and sworn statements by Refco employees.

Stanley S. Arkin, a lawyer for Mr. Sugrue, said his client should be given a "silver star" for looking out for his clients. Mr. Sugrue said his investors told him: "Thank God you went and got it. That's what you are supposed to do."

Yet Refco creditors got a federal court to freeze the money in the Lehman accounts, alleging in court papers that Mr. Sugrue was given preferential treatment. Those frozen accounts triggered the redemptions by PlusFunds' clients -- and the subsequent bankruptcy-court filing. The clients yanked more than $1 billion from the firms' funds -- about half their assets -- in the first two months of this year.

It is a quick reversal of fortune for Mr. Sugrue. Still on the board at PlusFunds, he is no longer an employee. "It feels like you got thrown out of the house you built," Mr. Sugrue said in the phone interview.

PlusFunds mainly offered funds designed to mimic the performance of Standard & Poor's hedge-fund indexes. The controversial money transferred from Refco was invested there to track 15 funds in S&P's Managed Futures index. PlusFunds' assets stood at more than $2.5 billion last summer.

After Mr. Sugrue started his fund firm, he continued to work closely with his old employer. Refco served as a clearing broker for several portfolios overseen by PlusFunds, according to court papers filed by Refco's creditors. And in 2003, Refco hired PlusFunds to manage a futures fund that did much of its trading through accounts at Refco, according to court filings by Refco creditors.

But the relationship extended beyond trading. Last spring, Refco Capital lent $158 million to Suffolk LLC, an entity affiliated with Mr. Sugrue, according to court papers filed by Refco creditors. Mr. Sugrue used the money to buy out minority shareholders of PlusFunds, the creditors say in court papers, adding that since then, Refco units lent another $50 million to entities related to Mr. Sugrue and other PlusFunds shareholders. Of that, $19.4 million went to an entity in which Mr. Sugrue is the sole member, court documents claim.

Several potential acquirers have emerged for PlusFunds, which will be auctioned off in April, according to public disclosures.

Separately, the federal bankruptcy judge overseeing Refco's bankruptcy proceedings ruled yesterday that Refco creditors investigating the brokerage firm's meltdown are entitled to documents from the underwriters of Refco's IPO. The judge also said former Refco directors, including private-equity investor Thomas H. Lee, should be allowed to collect on an insurance policy to cover legal expenses they incur in shareholder suits related to Refco's collapse.

A judge in a criminal case against Mr. Bennett, the former Refco CEO, set two trial dates yesterday -- Oct. 16, with a backup date of March 12, 2007. Mr. Bennett is fighting securities and fraud charges related to the Refco matter. The backup trial date was provided to accommodate Mr. Bennett's lawyer, Gary Naftalis.

—-- Peter A. McKay and Paul Davies contributed to this article.

Write to Carrick Mollenkamp at carrick.mollenkamp@wsj.com and Ian McDonald at ian.mcdonald@wsj.com

 
 
 
 
 

August 07, 2014

 
Michael Maiello

Michael Maiello

2/13/2006 @ 12:00AM

Unwilling Lenders

If Refco’s creditors get their way, hedge fund investors will face yet another risk.

Imagine the unimaginable–Fidelity Investments goes bankrupt. Fidelity’s creditors try to get what they’re owed–from the $1.2 trillion in client assets managed by the company. Sound crazy? It is, but it’s close to what Refco’s creditors are trying to do to investors in a hedge fund that kept accounts with the failed commodities trading firm.

Starting in 2004 brokers from firms like A.G. Edwards and Merrill Lynch sold clients shares of the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund, run by a company called PlusFunds. Refco was the clearing broker. Unlike most hedge funds, this one kept its barriers low. A net worth of $45,000 and the same in annual income was enough to qualify a customer.

The fund, which tracks the S&P Managed Futures Index and is meant to provide a hedge against the stock market, managed at least $312 million from some 1,000 investors when Refco collapsed. The fund were deposited with Refco, which placed the money in offshore accounts, where they aren’t subject to limits on margin debt that apply to domestic accounts

A lawsuit filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York by Refco’s unsecured creditors contends that when the fraud that led to Refco’s bankruptcy became clear in October, PlusFunds Chairman Christopher Sugrue stormed Refco’s offices and had $312 million transferred to new accounts at Lehman Brothers.

The creditors, including Wells Fargo and Cargill, say that this money should have stayed within Refco and that Sugrue and PlusFunds should get in line. The suit implies that Sugrue, a former Refco employee, used his influence at Refco to slide in front of other creditors. Luc A. Despins, the Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy attorney who filed the suit, declined comment.

But it’s not PlusFunds’ money–the $312 million comes from the investors in the S&P Managed Futures Index Fund. The creditors’ claims on those assets have prevented investors from getting their money back.

Marc Lowlicht, a certified financial planner with Further Lane Asset Management in Manhattan, has half a dozen clients in the fund. He complains: “If I wanted them to be creditors, I would have sold them bonds.”

Comments are turned off for this post.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 
 
 
 


August 07, 2014

Lacrosse

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lacrosse
UNC Lacrosse.jpg
Lacrosse at the University of North Carolina
Highest governing body Federation of International Lacrosse
First played As early as the 12th century
Codified in 1869
Characteristics
Contact Full contact
Team members 10 at a time 3 attack 3 midfielders 3 defenders 1 goalie
Equipment Lacrosse stick, helmet, shoulder pads, elbow pads, gloves
Presence
Olympic Part in the Summer Olympic programme in 1904 and 1908
Demonstrated in the 1928, 1932 and 1948 Summer Olympics

Lacrosse is a team sport of First Nations Iroquois origin played using a small rubber ball and a long-handled stick called a crosse or lacrosse stick. It is often played as a contact sport. The head of the lacrosse stick is strung with loose mesh designed to catch and hold the lacrosse ball. Offensively, the objective of the game is to score by shooting the ball into an opponent's goal, using the lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball to do so. Defensively, the objective is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to gain the ball through the use of stick checking and body contact or positioning. The sport has four major types: men's field lacrosse, women's lacrosse, box lacrosse and intercrosse. The sport consists of four positions: midfield, attack, defense, and goalie.

History

Main article: History of lacrosse

Lacrosse, today a marginally popular team sport in North America, may have developed as early as 1100 AD among indigenous peoples on the continent.[1][2] By the seventeenth century, it was well-established. It was documented by Jesuit missionary priests in the territory of present-day Canada. The game has undergone many modifications since that time.

In the traditional aboriginal Canadian version, each team consisted of about 100 to 1,000 men on a field that stretched from about 500 meters to 3 kilometers long.[3] These lacrosse games lasted from sunup to sundown for two to three days straight. These games were played as part of ceremonial ritual, a kind of symbolic warfare, to give thanks to the Creator or Master.[4]

Ball-play of the Choctaw — ball up by George Catlin, circa 1846–1850

Lacrosse played a significant role in the community and religious life of tribes across the continent for many years. Early lacrosse was characterized by deep spiritual involvement, befitting the spirit of combat in which it was undertaken. Those who took part did so in the role of warriors, with the goal of bringing glory and honor to themselves and their tribes.[5] The game was said to be played "for the Creator" or was referred to as "The Creator's Game."

The French Jesuit missionary Jean de Brébeuf saw Iroquois tribesmen play the game during 1637 in present-day New York. He was the first European to write about the game.[6] He called it la crosse ("the stick"). Some say the name originated from the French term for field hockey, le jeu de la crosse.[7] Others suggest that it was named after the crosier, a staff carried by bishops that bears a similarity to the sticks used in the sport.[8]

In 1856, William George Beers, a Canadian dentist, founded the Montreal Lacrosse Club. In 1867, Beers codified the game, shortening the length of each game and reducing the number of players to 12 per team. The first game played under Beers' rules was at Upper Canada College in 1867; they lost to the Toronto Cricket Club by a score of 3–1. By the 20th century, teams in high schools, colleges, and universities in Canada and the United States began playing the game.

Lacrosse was contested for medals in the 1904 and 1908 Olympics with teams from Canada, the United States, and Great Britain. It was contested as a demonstration sport in the 1928 and 1932 Olympics. On each occasion, a playoff was held in the United States to determine what team would go to the Olympics; each time the playoffs were won by the Johns Hopkins Blue Jays of the university in Baltimore, Maryland.[9]

Richmond Hill "Young Canadians" lacrosse team, 1885.

In the United States, lacrosse during the 1900s was primarily a regional sport centered around the East Coast, including states such as the following: Connecticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. In the last half of the 20th century, the sport has continued growth west of this region, including the Midwest, Oklahoma and Texas, as well as the West of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, California, Oregon, and Washington.

At the highest amateur level, it is represented by the collegiate NCAA Division I in the United States.[10] The first collegiate lacrosse program was established by New York University in 1877.[11] Nearly 100 years later, the 1971 tournament was the first Men's Lacrosse Championship sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).[12]

In other countries, the sport is also played at a high level on the amateur level by the Australian Lacrosse League, the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association, and club lacrosse leagues internationally.[13]

In 1998, a number of national lacrosse organizations in the United States merged to create US Lacrosse, a unified national governing body for men's and women's lacrosse in the United States. Headquartered in Baltimore, US Lacrosse seeks to provide a leadership role in virtually every aspect of the game.

In the summer of 2001, a men's professional field lacrosse league, known as Major League Lacrosse (MLL), was inaugurated in the United States. Initially starting with three teams, the MLL has grown to a current total of eight clubs located in major metropolitan areas in the United States. On July 4, 2008, Major League Lacrosse set the professional lacrosse attendance record: 20,116 fans attended a game at Invesco Field in Denver, Colorado.[10]

Types of play

Field lacrosse

There are ten players on each team: three attackers, three midfielders, three defenders and one goalie.

Diagram of a men's college lacrosse field

Each player carries a lacrosse stick (or crosse). A "short crosse" (or "short stick") measures between 40 inches (1.0 m) and 42 inches (1.1 m) long (head and shaft together) and is typically used by attackers or midfielders. A maximum of four players per team may carry a "long crosse" (sometimes called "long pole", "long stick" or "d-pole") which is 52 inches (1.3 m) to 72 inches (1.8 m) long; typically used by defenders or midfielders.

The head of the crosse on both long and short crosses must be 6.5 inches (17 cm) or larger at its widest point. The throat of the lacrosse head for college must be at least 3 inches wide. For high school play, there is no minimum width at its narrowest point; the only provision is that the ball must roll out unimpeded. The designated goalkeeper is allowed to have a stick from 40 inches (1.0 m) to 72 inches (1.8 m) long and the head of a goalkeeper's crosse may measure up to 12 inches (30 cm) wide, significantly larger than field players' heads, to assist in blocking shots.[14][15][16]

A face-off

The field of play is 110 yards (100 m) long and 60 yards (55 m) wide. The goals are 6 feet (1.8 m) by 6 feet (1.8 m). The goal sits inside a circular "crease", measuring 18 feet (5.5 m) in diameter.[14][15][16] Each offensive and defensive area is surrounded by a "restraining box." Each quarter, and after each goal scored, play is restarted with a face-off. During a face-off, two players lay their stick horizontally next to the ball, head of the stick inches from the ball and the butt-end pointing down the midfield line.[15] Face-off-men scrap for the ball, often by “clamping” it under their stick and flicking it out to their teammates. Attackers and defenders cannot cross their “restraining line” until one player from the midfield takes possession of the ball or the ball crosses the restraining line.[15] If a member of one team touches the ball and it travels outside of the playing area, play is restarted by awarding possession to the opposing team. During play, teams may substitute players in and out freely. Sometimes this is referred to as "on the fly" substitution. Substitution must occur within the designated exchange area (often called "the box") in order to be legal.[14][15][16]

For most penalties, the offending player is sent to the penalty box, which is located between each team's bench. His team must play without the player for a designated amount of time based upon the foul. (Most penalties are "releasable", that is, the penalty ends when a goal is scored by the non-offending team.) Technical fouls (such as offsides and holding) result in either a turnover or a player's suspension of 30 seconds, while personal fouls are generally penalized one minute. (Some infractions, such as playing with a stick that does not meet the specifications of the designated level of play, may serve non-releasable penalties of up to three minutes).[17] The team that has taken the penalty is said to be playing man down, while the other team is on the man up. Teams will use various lacrosse strategies to attack and defend while a player is being penalized. Offsides is penalized by a 30-second penalty. It occurs when there are more than 7 players on the defensive side of the field (three midfielders/three defensemen/one goalkeeper), or more than 6 players from one team on the offensive side of the field (three midfielders/three attack). The zones are separated by the midfield line.[14][15][16]

1904 Olympics Gold Medal winning Winnipeg Shamrocks lacrosse team

Lacrosse at the Olympics was a medal-earning sport in the 1904 and 1908 Summer Olympics.[18][19][20] Lacrosse was a demonstration sport in the 1928 and 1932 Summer Olympics, as well as at the 1948 Summer Olympics.[21][22][23][24]

The men's professional Major League Lacrosse has used different field lacrosse rules from the international, college, and high school programs. With intentions to increase scoring, the league employed a sixty-second shot clock and a two–point goal for shots taken outside a designated perimeter.[25] In 2007, the MLL was bolstered by a ten-year television contract with ESPN.[26]

Box lacrosse

Main article: Box lacrosse

Up until the 1930s, all lacrosse was played on large fields outdoors. The owners of Canadian hockey arenas invented a reduced-size version of the game, called box lacrosse, as a means to make more profit from their arena investments, and because severe winter weather in many areas limits outdoor play.

Since 1985, when the Canadian University Field Lacrosse Association (CUFLA) began operating a collegiate men's league, field lacrosse has witnessed a revival in Canada. There are now 12 varsity teams. In 1994, Canada declared lacrosse its national summer sport in the National Sports Act (Bill C-212).

In 1987, a men's professional box lacrosse league was started, called the Eagle Pro Box Lacrosse League. This league changed its name to the Major Indoor Lacrosse League, then later to the National Lacrosse League. It grew to encompass men's lacrosse clubs in 14 cities throughout the United States and Canada.

A game of box lacrosse

Box lacrosse is played by teams of six on a hockey rink where the ice has been removed or covered by artificial turf, or in an indoor soccer or lacrosse field. The enclosed playing area is called a box, in contrast to the open playing field of the traditional game.[27] This version of the game was introduced in the 1930s to promote business for hockey arenas,[28] and within several years had nearly supplanted field lacrosse in Canada.[29]

Box lacrosse is played at the highest level by the Senior A divisions of the Canadian Lacrosse Association and the National Lacrosse League (NLL). The National Lacrosse League employs some minor rule changes from the Canadien Lacrosse Association (CLA) rules. Notably, the games are played during the winter.[27] The NLL games consist of four fifteen-minute quarters compared with three periods of twenty minutes each (similar to ice hockey) in CLA games (multiple 15-minute OT periods for tied games, until whoever scores first). NLL players may use only sticks with hollow shafts, while CLA permits solid wooden sticks.:[30][31]

The goals in box lacrosse are much smaller than field lacrosse, traditionally 4 feet (1.2 m) wide by 4 feet (1.2 m) tall in box, and 4.6 feet (1.4 m) wide by 4 feet (1.2 m) tall in the NLL.[30] Also, the goaltender wears much more protective padding,[27] including a massive chest protector and armguard combination known as "uppers", large shin guards known as leg pads (both of which must follow strict measurement guidelines), and ice hockey-style masks or lacrosse helmets.[32] Also, at the professional level, box lacrosse goaltenders often use traditional wooden sticks outside of the NLL, which does not allow wooden sticks. This makes Box Lacrosse faster and rougher than the traditional Field Lacrosse.

The style of the game is quick, accelerated by the close confines of the floor and a shot clock. The shot clock requires the attacking team to take a shot on goal within 30 seconds of gaining possession of the ball. In addition, players must advance the ball from their own defensive end to the offensive side of the floor within 10 seconds.[27]

Box lacrosse is also a much more physical game. Since cross checking is legal in box lacrosse, players wear rib pads in addition to the shoulder and elbow pads that field lacrosse players wear. Box lacrosse players wear a different type of helmet as well, a hockey helmet with a box lacrosse cage.

For most penalties, the offending player is sent to the penalty box and his team has to play without him (thus lacking one player) for a short amount of time. Most penalties last for two minutes, unless a five-minute major penalty has been assessed. What separates box lacrosse (and ice hockey) from other sports is that at the top levels of professional and junior lacrosse, a five-minute major penalty is given and the players are not ejected for participating in a fight.[33]

Women's lacrosse

Main article: Women's lacrosse

The rules of women's lacrosse differ significantly from men's lacrosse, most notably by equipment and the degree of allowable physical contact.[34] Women's lacrosse rules also differ significantly between the US and all other countries, who play by the Federation of International Lacrosse, or FIL, rules. Women's lacrosse does not promote physical contact, primarily because the only protective equipment worn for this sport is a mouth guard sometimes and face guard (mandatory in the United States, optional internationally) and thin gloves. Stick checking (with several rules applied), and not body checking as in men's lacrosse, is permitted in the women's game, but only in certain levels of play. Sometimes checking can lead to body checking; while this is still not permitted in a women's game, some referees will allow limited body checking. Women's lacrosse also does not allow players to have a pocket, or loose net, on the lacrosse stick.

The first modern women's lacrosse game was held at St Leonards School in Scotland in 1890. It was introduced by the school's headmistress Louisa Lumsden after a visit to Quebec, where she saw it played.[35] The first women's lacrosse team in the United States was established at Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, Maryland in 1926. Men’s and women’s lacrosse were played under virtually the same rules, with no protective equipment, until the mid-1930s.

Both the number of players on the field, as well as the general set up of the field, differ from men's lacrosse. In women's lacrosse there are 3 defensive players, five mid-fielders, three attack players and one goalie per team, as opposed to men's lacrosse, where there are only three mid-fielders. Also, women players must abide by certain boundaries that do not exist in men's play. The three specific boundaries are the 8-meter "fan" in front of the goal (11 meters internationally), the 12-meter (15 meters internationally) half circle that surrounds the 8-meter half circle, and the draw circle in the center of the field, which is used for the women's version of "face-offs", known as "draws". The goal circle is also positioned slightly closer to the end line in women's lacrosse, compared to men's. In women's lacrosse on either the offensive or defensive end, the players are not able to step inside the goal circle for any reason, except when the goalkeeper has stepped out of the circle and one defensive player has stepped in as her deputy; this becomes a "goal-circle violation". However, at the women's collegiate level, a new rule has been established that allows defenders to pass through the goal circle.

Internationally, the game is commonly played in British girls' independent schools. While a minor sport in Australia, it is played to a very high standard at the elite level. Women's lacrosse has seen significant growth in Europe since the beginning of the 21st century, particularly in Germany, the Czech Republic, and the Netherlands. Japan entered its first team into the World Cup in 1993, and South Korea followed suit in 2009. In 2012, the first Israeli international team competed in the European Championships in Amsterdam.

The Australia national squad won the 2005 Women's Lacrosse World Cup. The 2009 Women's World Cup was played in Prague, Czech Republic, won by the United States, and the 2013 World Cup was played in Oshawa, Canada, again won by the United States.[36]

College lacrosse

Main article: College lacrosse

Lacrosse in the United States is played at the collegiate level in both the club and sanctioned team sport. There are currently 87 and 3/4 NCAA sanctioned Division I men's lacrosse teams, 46 Division II men's lacrosse teams, and 189 Division III men's lacrosse teams. There are also currently 91 Division I women's lacrosse teams, 57 Division II women's lacrosse Teams, and 201 Division III women's lacrosse teams. 209 collegiate men's club teams compete at the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association level, including most major universities in the United States. Another 107 schools have club teams in the National College Lacrosse League.

The first U. S. intercollegiate game was played on November 22, 1877 between New York University and Manhattan College. Lacrosse had been introduced in upstate New York in the 1860s. Lacrosse was further introduced to the Baltimore area in the 1890s. These two areas continue to be the hotbeds of college lacrosse in the U.S. The first intercollegiate lacrosse tournament was held in 1881, with Harvard beating Princeton, 3-0, in the championship game.

The NCAA men's Lacrosse Division I in 1971, when Cornell took the first championship over Maryland, 12–6. Johns Hopkins has 9 championships with three consecutive wins from 1978 to 1980. The other two teams that have three consecutive wins are Syracuse from 1988 to 1990 and Princeton from 1996 to 1998. Syracuse also holds the NCAA record of championships with 11, the last occurring in 2009. In 2013 Duke beat Syracuse to claim the NCAA Division I Championship in Philadelphia.[37] The Division I national championship tournament draws one of the largest crowds of any Division I NCAA sport.

The NCAA men's Lacrosse Division III is growing at a much faster rate than Division I. There are currently 208 Division III teams playing in 25 different conferences in 2013,[38] compared to 130 teams in 2005. Stevenson University was the 2013 Division III national champion.

There is also the MCLA. This is Mens Club Lacrosse Association. It is played at schools that do not have a NCAA lacrosse team. The 2012 Division I MCLA champion was Colorado State University and Division II was won by the University of St. Thomas.[39]

NCAA women's Lacrosse Division I began play in 1982. The University of Maryland, College Park has traditionally dominated the women's intercollegiate play, producing many head coaches across the country and many U.S. national team players. The Terrapins won seven consecutive NCAA championships, from 1995 through 2001. Princeton University's women's teams have made it to the final game seven times since 1993 and have won three NCAA titles, in 1993, 2002, and 2003. In recent years, Northwestern University has become a force, winning the national championship from 2005 through 2009.[40] Maryland ended Northwestern's streak by defeating the Wildcats in the 2010 final, however Northwestern has since won the 2011 and 2012 national titles. Maryland again claimed the national championship in 2014.

Major League Lacrosse

Major League Lacrosse (MLL) is a Professional lacrosse league founded in 1999 in the United States that showcases the world's best players. The season consists of 56 games running from April to August. MLL uses standard lacrosse rules with several exceptions, such as a 16-yard 2-point line and a 60-second shot clock.[41] Regular season play began in 2001 with 6 teams, with plans to expand to 19 teams. The MLL currently has 8 teams: Boston, Annapolis, New York City, Rochester, Denver, Columbus, Charlotte, and Palm Beach County (formerly Hamilton).

International lacrosse

Lacrosse has been played for the most part in Canada and the United States, with small but dedicated lacrosse communities in the United Kingdom and Australia. Recently, however, lacrosse has begun to flourish at an international level, with teams being established particularly in Europe and east Asia.

With lacrosse not having been an official Olympic sport since 1908, the pinnacle of international lacrosse competition consists of the quadrennial World Championships. Begun in 1968, world championships began as a four-team invitational tournament sponsored by the International Lacrosse Federation. Until 1986, lacrosse world championships had been contested only by the US, Canada, England, and Australia. Scotland and Wales had teams competing in the women's edition. They are now held for lacrosse at senior men, senior women, under 19 men and under 19 women levels.

With the expansion of the game internationally, the 2006 Men's World Championship was contested by 21 countries and the Iroquois Nationals, representing the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. They are the only Native American/First Nations team to compete internationally. The 2009 Women's World Cup was competed for by 16 nations.

In 2003, the first World Indoor Lacrosse Championship was contested by six nations at four sites in Ontario. Canada won the championship in a final game against the Iroquois Nationals, 21-4. The 2007 WILC was held in Halifax from May 14–20, and also won by Canada. Competition included the Iroquois Nationals and teams from Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, England, Ireland, Scotland, and the United States.

The World Lacrosse Championships have been dominated by the United States, particularly in the men's game. Its only world championship game losses at either level was in the 1978 final and 2006 final, both to Canada. The USA has won 9 of the 11 senior men's and all six under-19 men's tournaments to date.

In the women's game, Australia has provided stiffer competition, having won 6 of 14 games against the USA at senior world championships, including one draw. The USA has won 6 of the 8 senior women's, and 2 of the 3 under-19 women's tournaments to date, with the other world championships won by Australia.

The Iroquois Nationals are a team with members representing the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. The team was admitted to the International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) in 1990. It is the only First Nations team sanctioned to compete in any sport internationally. The Nationals placed fourth in the 1998, 2002 and 2006 World Lacrosse Championships. In 2008, the Iroquois were admitted as the Haudenosunee Nation to the International Federation of Women's Lacrosse Associations (IFWLA), since merged with the FIL (see below).

Federation of International Lacrosse

One obstacle to the international development of lacrosse had been separate governing bodies for the men's and women's versions of the sport. Men's lacrosse was governed by ILF and the women's version by IFWLA. In August 2008, after four years of negotiation, the two bodies merged to form a single unified body, the Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL). All championships previously operated by the ILF and IFWLA were taken over by the FIL. The FIL hosted the 2010 World Lacrosse Championship in Manchester, England, between July 15 to 24, 2010.[42] The 2014 World Lacrosse Championship will be held in Denver, Colorado, US.

Internationally, as of 2013, a total of 47 members belong to the Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL). Only the United States, Canada, Australia, and the Iroquois Nationals have finished in the top three places at the World Lacrosse Championships.

Internationally, the World Indoor Lacrosse Championships are held every four years and are also sponsored by the FIL. Only eight nations have competed so far. Canada, the Iroquois Nationals and the United States have finished in the most coveted 1st, 2nd and 3rd places at these events.

European Lacrosse Foundation

A player taking a "dive shot".

The next largest international field lacrosse competition are the European Lacrosse Championships, held for both men and women's teams. Since 1995, the European Lacrosse Federation (ELF) has been running the European Championships. Before 2001 they held the Championships annually, but that year the ELF changed the format to every four years, between the World Championships. Before 2004, only seven nations had ever participated.

In 2004 a record number of countries participated, fielding 12 men's and 6 women's teams, making it the largest international lacrosse event of the year. In 2008 the European Lacrosse Championships were held in Lahti, Finland, with 18 competing countries. England placed first with the Netherlands and Germany placing second and third, respectively. The most recent ELF Championships were held in Amsterdam in 2012. England was victorious over Ireland in the championship game, and Sweden took third place. 32 nations compete now in the international lacrosse championships for the year 2014


August 07, 2014

You've selected the U.S. Edition. Would you like to make this your default edition?    Yes   |   NoClose 
SHARE THIS
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
 

Surfers rejoice, residents stock up as Hawaii preps for rare cyclones

By Jason Hanna and Steve Almasy, CNN
updated 11:08 PM EDT, Wed August 6, 2014
Source: CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Big Island under hurricane warning, Hurricane Iselle expected Thursday night
  • Hurricanes and other tropical cyclones rarely make landfall in Hawaii
  • Julio has potential to brush islands later as a tropical storm
  • Schools in Hawaii and Maui counties will be closed Thursday
 

Are you preparing for the cyclones? Share your images with CNN iReport, but please stay safe.

(CNN) -- You'll have to pardon the people of Hawaii if they are freaking out over an approaching hurricane. It's the kind of thing that rarely happens around there.

And there are two headed that way.

There's Hurricane Iselle, which looks like it will smack into the Big Island on Thursday night, and the less threatening Hurricane Julio, due a few days later.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu issued a hurricane warning for Hawaii County on Wednesday afternoon.

"Tropical storm conditions are expected on the Big Island of Hawaii Thursday, with hurricane conditions expected Thursday night," the center advised. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 90 mph on Wednesday night but Iselle was expected to weaken as it nears Hawaii.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect for the islands of Lanai, Maui, Molokai and Oahu.

Hawaii is a rare target for any tropical cyclone, let alone two.

In Hilo, people were standing on beaches, anxiously looking out at the water.

"The surfers get excited about these storms, but everyone else is freaking out," said Chris Owens, owner of East Side Builders and a longtime resident. "A lot of the locals here believe that the tall mountains on the Big Island shield them from hurricanes, but in 24 hours this theory could be proven wrong."

Customers formed lines from the front to the back of a Cost-U-Less store on Tuesday, clearing shelves of bottled water and stocking up on other supplies.

"A lot of rice, water, toilet paper," store worker Mike Kelley told CNN affiliate KGMB.

Bottled water also was sold out at a Honolulu-area Costco.

"So we're going to bottle up water at home now and just pray for the best," would-be customer Lisa Viela told CNN affiliate KHON on Tuesday.

Jackie Collins joined a steady stream of drivers trying to fill up vehicle gas tanks at the same Costco.

"We came last night, but it was too crowded, so I thought, 'Well, today I'd better go,'" she told KHON.

Not everyone was worried. Scott Murray, who owns the Hilo Surfboard Co. and has lived on the Big Island for more than 60 years, said many residents were more optimistic for good surf than concerned about damage and flooding.

"I'm not really worried about his storm," Murray said.

The schools on the Big Island and Maui will be closed Thursday as residents await Iselle's arrival.

Hawaii's primary elections will go on as scheduled Saturday, despite the storms, KGMB reported. Local media reported that many turned up for early voting in expectation of severe weather on election day. Others are concerned that voter turnout could be affected.

Julio, also churning westward in the Pacific, could potentially brush the islands on Sunday as a tropical storm, forecasters said.

Iselle is expected to bring heavy rain and high surf, which could lead to coastal flooding on islands already saturated by recent rains, the National Weather Service said.

Julio is expected to move north of Hawaii on Sunday, but outer bands of rain and strong winds still could affect the islands.

Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie signed an emergency proclamation, his office said. It gives the government access to the state's disaster funds.

Some airlines are making concessions to customers ahead of the storms. For people who had been scheduled to travel to or from Hawaiian airports on Thursday and Friday, United Airlines and Hawaiian Airlines say they won't charge fees to change reservations, and they'll waive differences in fares for those changes.

Island Air will do the same for passengers ticketed from Thursday though Tuesday. Delta said it would waive fees for reservation changes for Thursday and Friday, but fare increases could apply.

Hawaii doesn't often have to prepare for cyclones. A 2002 report by the U.S. Geological Survey said that "actual hurricane strikes on the Hawaiian Islands are relatively rare in the modern record."

"More commonly, near-misses that generate large swell and moderately high winds causing varying degrees of damage are the hallmark of hurricanes passing close to the islands," according to the report.

CNN's Taylor Ward, Mariano Castillo, Katia Hetter and Tony Marco contributed to this report.

Part of complete coverage on
Hurricane & tropical storm season
updated 7:44 AM EDT, Tue June 3, 2014
Apparently sexism isn't just a social problem -- if you're in the path of a hurricane, gender bias might actually kill you.
updated 5:12 PM EDT, Thu May 22, 2014
How will El Niño affect hurricane season? It depends on the ocean, forecasters say.
updated 12:58 PM EDT, Thu April 10, 2014
The U.S. could be in for another quiet hurricane season this year.
updated 6:49 AM EDT, Tue August 5, 2014
Here is a look at what you need to know about the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season.
updated 12:20 PM EDT, Fri October 26, 2012
In areas where hurricanes can strike, it's a good idea to have a closet or an area set aside for storm preparedness storage.
 
can opener
All you need to know about keeping your food safe to eat and what to have on hand in the event of a weather emergency.
updated 7:39 PM EDT, Thu July 3, 2014
Water jugs and batteries are not the only things to consider when extreme weather threatens.
updated 10:52 AM EDT, Thu June 5, 2014
Here's a look at some hurricane statistics you need to know.
updated 11:53 AM EDT, Wed May 28, 2014
Here's a look at what you need to know about the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30.
updated 5:57 AM EST, Sat February 9, 2013
In our increasingly digital world, a mobile phone or other portable device is often a one-stop communication device.
updated 3:23 PM EDT, Thu August 30, 2012
You don't have to leave your pets behind in a disaster. Here are ways to keep them safe.
 
ADVERTISEMENT
 



August 05, 2014

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

The Adventures of Christopher Sugrue: Angola Episode 2

 
From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

Ola! I just came back from another vacation to one of the most amazing places in the planet, Angola. In the second episode of the "Christopher Sugrue in Angola" adventure, I went to both familiar and new places, visiting old friends and meeting new ones. Wherever I went though, there was always something fun and exciting to do.

The Beaches

Because I had such a good time the last time I was there, I came back to the Angolan beaches. Ilha do Cabo, Mussulo, Corimba, Santiago, and Palmeirinhas didn't change much, and it was a welcome familiarity. The Angolan sea, sand, and sunshine were as fantastic as ever.

The Town

In my last trip there, I made friends with a few locals with whom I kept in touch with. When I saw Diego again, it was like I never left town. "Christopher Sugrue, Angola misses you," he said. We met with some old friends as he introduced me to new folks. We spent the night chatting, dining, wining, and dancing to the old-meets-new ambiance of the African locale.
From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

The Parks

After a couple of days lounging in the familiar places, I visited the parks I wasn't able to go to the last time. Iona National Park may not have been the "animal paradise" it once was, but the marvelous rock formations there were a sight to behold. Cameia National Park led me through the labyrinth of waterfalls, rocks, different climates, and various cultures and colors that is Angola. It was a refreshing reprieve from the mundane hullaballoo of city life.

From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

As always, Angola will be one of my favorite spots in the world. Angola, até que nós nos encontrarmos outra vez!

Follow me on Twitter.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Christopher Sugrue’s Pointers on Paddling

 
Surfing Legend Tom Curren showcasing his buttery smooth technique, from Christopher Sugrue Photos


My name is Christopher Sugrue. As an advertising creative, I pitch the products of my mind’s musings to corporate bigwigs and serious suits for a living. On the interims between the serial episodes of brainstorming and bluffing that constitute my job description, however, I grab my wetsuit and board, fill my tank up, hit the road that leads straight to my favorite sparkling blue water, and surf.

Kate Bosworth paddles out in a scene from surfer film "Blue Crush" (2002), from Christopher Sugrue Photos




What beginner surfers need to know is that paddling makes up a huge chunk of the time one is in the water with a board. Paddling is how you propel yourself beyond the breaking waves and onto the lineup to hitch a ride on a wave.


This brings us to Christopher Sugrue’s paddling pointers:


From Christopher Sugrue Photos




From Christopher Sugrue Photos
  • On a day when the water isn’t too choppy, choose a spot where you won’t knock anyone else out.
  • Lay your board flat on the water. Lie on your stomach with your weight along the center of the board and your feet raised slightly off the end.
  • Keep your body far back enough to keep the nose of the board a few inches out of the water’s surface, but not too far back that you create too much drag.
  • Reach out with one arm at a time and stroke your way through the water. There’s no need to dig your arms to deep – just maintain a rhythm that pulls the board through the water.


  • Make sure that the nose of your board does not dip underwater at any point. To balance yourself on the board, try moving your legs slightly apart.
  • When paddling, maintaining good balance and proper board waxing are key to prevent from digging the nose of your board underwater or from having the board shoot up in front of you.



Find Christopher Sugrue on Facebook.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Christopher Sugrue Defines More Surf Slang

 
My name is Christopher Sugrue, advertising suit by day, swell rider all other times. In another blog entry I discussed some terms surfers use as everyday vernacular.


Here are a couple more terms and their definitions, from a “brah” to many others who fall victim to the befuddlement that often hounds non-surfing folk.

From CHRIS SUGRUE

From CHRIS SUGRUE

From CHRIS SUGRUE

From CHRIS SUGRUE

From CHRIS SUGRUE
  • Bogus – This means fake, plain wrong, or really lame.
  • Brodad – This refers to a surfer wannabe who overuses the terms “Bro” or “Brah.”

  • Burnt Reynolds – This is a term used for a surfer who is badly burnt.
  • Cactus Juiced – ‘To experience an injury that leaves you unable to surf.’ Example: “Did you see Christopher Sugrue break his ankle on that reef? Bro was totally Cactus Juiced.”
  • Cash – Describes the feeling when the flame goes out, this term is used ‘cashed,’ to mean “tired,” “relaxed,” or “done.”
  • Dirt Baggin’ It – This describes living conditions wherein a surfer is making do with a bare-bones existence to save every bit of dough he or she has for the next surf trip.
  • Drop In – This means to catch a waved that is already occupied. The second surfer takes off on the shoulder in front of someone who is both deeper in and has the right of way.

  • Dunzo – This means done, or finished. Example, “Max you and I are dunzo.”
  • Eat Foam – This describes what happens when a surfer wipes out on a huge wave and ends up swallowing some of it.

  • Excellent – This is 80’s surfer lingo for “cool.” Saying it in a long, drawn out manner is imperative.

  • Gnar – This means the same thing as ‘gnarly,’ but it sounds better.
  • Gnarmax – This means ‘gnarly’ to the maximum. The waves can’t get any cooler than that.

  • Graze – This is surfer for ‘to eat.’
Follow Chris Sugrue on Twitter and Facebook.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Christopher Sugrue on Cause-Related Advertising

 

I am Christopher Sugrue, and I am an advertising consultant. I have always been passionate about advertising – I have always known it was something I would want to do for a living. At first, the thought of any brand I handle being able to achieve top-of-mind awareness was the only thing that inspired me at work. Later on, it became this: to ensure that the campaigns I create for my clients tell a bigger, more meaningful message.


From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

I have always believed that advertising can be used as a means to make the public more socially aware. While branding is still a major and inevitable factor in advertising, I applaud the efforts of some companies in churning out advertising campaigns that send a socially-responsible message, while promoting their product at the same time.


From CHRISTOPHER SUGRUE

I, Christopher Sugrue, am a strong advocate of cause-related advertising. That social responsibility can work hand-in-hand with consumerism is just plain genius. Among my favorite cause-related ads include the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty, which encouraged the breaking of beauty stereotypes. It gave rise to the Dove Self-Esteem Fund, which aims to empower 5 million young women through information on positive body image, because, as the ad says, “every girl deserves to feel good about herself and see how beautiful she really is.” I also like how Lee, a traditional male brand, empowered consumers to organize workplace drives for employees to contribute $5 for the right to wear jeans on the first Friday in October, starting in 1996. The fund is being used for breast cancer research and advocacy.




To find out more about my thoughts on advertising for a cause, visit my Facebook page.